Google's Search Engine Optimization Starter Guide

Google's Search Engine Optimization Starter Guide

This article is useful for novice webmasters for search engine optimization topics and wants to increase their site's interaction with users and search engines. Although this guide will not tell you the secrets that will automatically rank your site first for queries on Google (sorry!), Following the best practices outlined below will make it easier for search engines to crawl, index and understand your content.

Google's Search Engine Optimization Starter Guide


Search engine optimization is frequently approximately making small adjustments to components of your website. while viewed individually, these adjustments might appear to be incremental improvements, however, when combined with other optimizations, they may have a great effect for your website online's consumer enjoy and overall performance in natural search results. you're likely already familiar with a number of the topics on this guide because they may be vital components for any web page, however, you may not be making the most out of them.

Even though this guide's name contains the phrases "search engine", we'd like to mention which you must base your optimization choices first and predominant on what is exceptional for the traffic of your web site. they may be the primary clients of your content material and are the use of SERPs to locate your paintings. Focusing too tough on precise tweaks to gain ranking inside the natural consequences of search engines like google and yahoo may not supply the preferred consequences. search engine optimization is about putting your web site's first-rate foot forward in terms of visibility in engines like google, but your closing customers are your users, now not search engines like google.

Your site may be smaller or larger than our instance website and provide massively distinct content material, however, the optimization topics we discuss underneath should practice to websites of all sizes and brands. we are hoping our manual gives you a few fresh ideas on the way to enhance your internet site, and we might love to pay attention your questions, remarks, and success stories in the Google Webmaster help forum.



An example may help our explanations, so we've created a fictitious website to follow throughout the guide. For each topic, we've fleshed out enough information about the site to illustrate the point being covered. Here's some background information about the site we'll use:

Create unique, accurate page titles

A title tag tells both users and search engines what the topic of a particular page is. The <title> tag should be placed within the <head> tag of the HTML example. Ideally, you should create a
unique title for each page on your site.

Indicate page titles

The title of the homepage for our baseball card site, which lists the business name and three main focus areas.

Example below:

<html>
<head>
<title>Brandon's Baseball playing cards - purchase cards, Baseball news, Card expenses</title>
<meta name="description=" content="Brandon's Baseball playing cards gives a massive choice of vintage and contemporary baseball cards for sale. We also provide daily baseball information and occasions in.">
</head>
<body>

Page title contents are displayed in search results

the contents of the title tag will usually appear in the first line of the results (if you're unfamiliar with the different parts of a Google search result,
you might want to check out the anatomy of a search result video by Google engineer Matt Cutts, and this helpful diagram of a Google
search results page). Words in the title are bolded if they appear in the user's search query. This can help users recognize if the page is likely to be relevant to their search.

The identity to your homepage can list the name of your website/enterprise and will consist of different bits of important facts just like the bodily place of the business or maybe some of its major focuses or offerings.



Accurately describe the page's content

Choose a title that effectively communicates the topic of the page's content.

  • choosing a title that has no relation to the content on the page.
  • using default or vague titles like "Untitled" or "New Page 1".



Create unique title tags for each page

Each of your pages should ideally have a unique title tag, which helps Google know how the page is distinct from the others on your site. using a single title tag across all of your site's pages or a large group of pages.


Use brief, but descriptive titles

Titles can be both short and informative. If the title is too long, Google will show only a portion of it in the search result.

  • using extremely lengthy titles that are unhelpful to users
  • stuffing unneeded keywords in your title tags.


Make Us of the Description Meta Tag

Summaries can be defined for each page this is page's description meta tag gives Google and other search engines a summary of what the page is about.

Use unique descriptions for each page

Having a different description meta tag for each page helps both users and Google, especially in searches where users may bring up multiple pages on your domain (e.g. searches using the site: operator). If your site has thousands or even millions of pages, hand-crafting description meta tags probably aren't feasible. In this case, you could automatically generate description meta tags based on
each page's content.



Improve the structure of your URLs

Creating descriptive categories and filenames for the documents on your website can not only help you keep your site better organized, but it could also lead to better crawling of your documents by search engines. Also, it can create easier, "friendlier" URLs for those that want to link to your content. Visitors may be intimidated by extremely long and cryptic URLs that contain few recognizable words.

URLs like can be confusing and unfriendly. Users would have a hard time reciting the URL from memory or creating a link to it. Also, users may believe that a portion of the URL is unnecessary, especially if the URL shows many unrecognizable parameters. They might leave off a part, breaking the link.

Lastly, remember that the URL to a document is displayed as part of a search result in Google, below the document's title and snippet. Like the title and snippet, words in the URL on the search result appear in bold if they appear in the user's query. To the right is another example showing a URL on our domain for a page containing an article about the rarest baseball cards. The words in the URL might appeal to a search user more than an ID number like "www.educationfresh.com" would.

Google is good at crawling all types of URL structures, even if they're quite complex, but spending the time to make your URLs as simple as possible for both users and search engines can help. Some webmasters try to achieve this by rewriting their dynamic URLs to static ones; while Google is fine with this, we'd like to note that this is an advanced procedure and if done incorrectly, could cause crawling issues with your site. To learn even more about good URL structure, we recommend this Webmaster Help Center page on creating Google-friendly URLs.

Use words in URLs

URLs with words that are relevant to your site's content and structure are friendlier for visitors navigating your site. Visitors remember them better and might be more willing to link to them.

Create a simple directory structure

Use a directory structure that organizes your content well and makes it easy for visitors to know where they're at on your site. Try using your directory structure to indicate the type of content found at that
URL.

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